Satellite Image of “Wish” Art by Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada

satellite image wishGeoEye-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of “Wish” by Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada

(Image Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation)

Satellite image of “Wish” art by Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada a portrait of a young girl making a wish covers eleven acres of the Titanic quarter of Belfast. Approximately 30,000 wooden pegs, 2,000 tons of soil, 2,000 tons of sand, plus grass, stones and strings were used to make the portrait. Adjacent buildings allow viewings until December 2013, but it is most comfortably viewed by aerial or satellite photo.

Wish was eighteen months in the planning, and one month in execution, with a huge team of volunteers. As Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada had envisioned, the Belfast community very much collaborated with and supported the project, from construction companies to the fire brigade. The portrait is based on a photo of an anonymous six-year-old Belfast girl that he had taken on one of his many trips to get to know and love the city in the prior eighteen months. Rodríguez-Gerada wanted to lift the pure moment of a child’s wish to the magnitude of a universal statement, particularly in the context of city like Belfast. For the artist it was the enormity of people coming together in support on such a large scale that amplified such a simple moment to a profound level.

Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada is a Cuban American contemporary artist. He is a founder of the New York Culture Jamming movement and an innovator in the international urban art scene. Since the late 90´s he has been replacing the faces of cultural icons chosen by advertisers with the faces of anonymous people to question the controls imposed on public space, the role models designated and the type of events that are guarded by the collective memory.

Rodríguez-Gerada´s unique direction was mentioned in Naomi Klein´s book No Logo and was a precursor of the use of anonymous portraits now common in street art. His spectacular interventions are created for the sake of bringing awareness to relevant social issues. His large scale time base works avoid negative impact on the environment, challenge the conformity in contemporary art and allow for a reflection that goes beyond the completion of the piece to focus in its concept, process, and the metaphor that comes forth because of the material chosen. Visit Jorge’s website and more works of art.

Satellite Image of Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Satellite Image Mount RushmorePleiades (0.5m) Satellite Image of Mount Rushmore National Memorial – Pennington County, South Dakota

Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Roosevelt and Lincoln

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(Image Copyright © AIRBUS and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation)

Pleiades satellite image of Mount Rushmore National Memorial a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota, in the United States. Sculpted by Danish-American Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln Borglum, Mount Rushmore features 60-foot (18 m) sculptures of the heads of four United States presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial is host to almost three million visitors a year from across the country and around the world. They come to marvel at the majestic beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota and to learn about the birth, growth, development and the preservation of America. Over the decades, Mount Rushmore has grown in fame as a symbol of America a symbol of freedom and hope for people from all cultures and backgrounds.

“The purpose of the memorial is to communicate the founding, expansion, preservation, and unification of the United States with colossal statues of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt.” – Gutzon Borglum

Read more on Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore Memorial

 

Satellite Image of Wadi Rum “Valley of the Moon”

satellite image wadi rum valley of the moonPleiades-1A (0.5m) Satellite Image of Wadi Rum “The Valley of the Moon” – Jordan

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Copyright © ASTRIUM and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All Rights reserved.

Wadi Rum “The Valley of the Moon” is a valley cut into the sandstone and granite rock in southern Jordan 60 km (37 mi) to the east of Aqaba; it is the largest wadi in Jordan. Wadi Rum has been inhabited by many human cultures since prehistoric times, with many cultures–including the Nabateans–leaving their mark in the form of rock paintings, graffiti, and temples.

The highest elevation in Wadi Rum is Mount Um Dami at 1,840 m (6,040 ft) high, second highest Jabal Rum 1,734 metres (5,689 ft) above sea level and third Khaz’ali Canyon is the site of petroglyphs etched into the cave walls depicting humans and antelopes dating back to the Thamudic times. The village of Wadi Rum itself consists of several hundred Bedouin inhabitants with their goat-hair tents and concrete houses and also their four wheel vehicles, one school for boys and one for girls, a few shops, and the headquarters of the Desert Patrol. Read more on Wadi Rum….

wadi rum

Satellite Image of Nazca Lines in Peru

satellite image nazca line peruPleiades-1B (0.5m) Satellite Image Nazca Lines in Peru

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Copyright © ASTRIUM and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Nazca Lines are a series of ancient geoglyphs located in the Nazca Desert in southern Peru. They were designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994. The high, arid plateau stretches more than 80 kilometres (50 mi) between the towns of Nazca and Palpa on the Pampas de Jumana about 400 km south of Lima. Although some local geoglyphs resemble Paracas motifs, scholars believe the Nazca Lines were created by the Nazca culture between 400 and 650 AD. The hundreds of individual figures range in complexity from simple lines to stylized hummingbirds, spiders, monkeys, fish, sharks, orcas, and lizards.

The lines are shallow designs made in the ground by removing the reddish pebbles and uncovering the whitish/grayish ground beneath. Hundreds are simple lines or geometric shapes; more than seventy are zoomorphic designs of animals such as birds, fish, llamas, jaguar, monkey, or human figures. Other designs include phytomorphic shapes such as trees and flowers. The largest figures are over 200 metres (660 ft) across. Scholars differ in interpreting the purpose of the designs, but in general they ascribe religious significance to them. Read more about the Nazca Lines.

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Satellite Image of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia

satellite image great barrier reefWorldview-2 (0.5m) Satellite Image of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia

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Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.

Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef system composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for over 2,600 kilometres (1,600 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi). The reef is located in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

The Great Barrier Reef can be seen from outer space in the above satellite image from the Worldview-2 satellite and is the world’s biggest single structure made by living organisms. This reef structure is composed of and built by billions of tiny organisms, known as coral polyps. It supports a wide diversity of life and was selected as a World Heritage Site in 1981. CNN labeled it one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The Queensland National Trust named it a state icon of Queensland.

A large part of the reef is protected by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, which helps to limit the impact of human use, such as fishing and tourism. Other environmental pressures on the reef and its ecosystem include runoff, climate change accompanied by mass coral bleaching, and cyclic population outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns starfish. According to a study published in October 2012 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the reef has lost more than half its coral cover since 1985. Read more on the Great Barrier Reef.

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great barrier reefImage credit: Qualia

Satellite Image of the Island of Love ‘Galesnjak’

satellite image island of lovePleiades-1A (0.5m) Satellite Image – Galesnjak, “Island of Love”, Croatia

Pasman Channel, Adriatic Sea

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Image copyright © ASTRIUM and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.

Between the islands of Pasman and the town of Turanj on mainland Croatia, the Island of Love is one of the worlds few naturally occurring heart-shaped objects.

The island has a surface area of 0.132 km2, with its beach measuring 1.55 km in length. The island features two peaks, the highest of which is 36 m high above sea level.

Galesnjak is privately owned and contains only wild plants and trees. Human activity recorded on this island are three known Illyrian burial mounds and remains of an ancient building’s foundations.

The island’s unusual shape was first recorded in the early 19th century by Napoleon’s cartographer Charles-Francois Beautemps-Beaupre, who included it in his 1806 atlas of the Dalmatian coast (kept today at the National and University Library in Zagreb).

The island was highlighted on Google Earth in February 2009, which brought the island to worldwide attention.

Most Popular Satellite Images of 2012

Most popular satellite image for 2012 by Visions of Earth. These satellite images were viewed most popular (top to bottom) and we thank everyone for viewing. Enjoy :-)

IKONOS (1M) Satellite Image of the Great Blue Hole, Belize

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(Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.)

Satellite Image Great Blue Hole Belize

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image (0.5 m) – Mt. Everest – Himalayas in Nepal, China/Tibet

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(Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation)

satellite image mt everest

GeoEye-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image  of Grand Canyon National Park Skywalk in Arizona

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satellite image grand canyon national park

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) –  Construction of Palm Jumeirah - Palm Islands, Dubai, UAE

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satellite image palm jumeirah island dubai

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image (0.5 m) – Burj Khalifa, Dubai, UAE – World’s Tallest Building

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satellite image Burj Khalifa Dubai, U.A.E. world's tallest building

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) – “The Pearl” Doha, Qatar

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satellite image The Pearl, Doha, Qatar

GeoEye-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of ‘The Burning Man” – Black Rock Desert, Northern Nevada

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satellite image burning man

 

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) – Burj Al Arab Hotel – Dubai, UAE

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(Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of  Satellite Imaging Corporation)

Dubai, UAE

WorldView-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Disaster, Giglio, Italy

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satellite image Costa Concordia, cruise ship disaster

GeoEye-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of 2012 Olympic Stadium, London

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satellite image olympic stadium

Landsat Satellite Image (15 m) – Antarctica

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(Image Credit © NASA and Courtesy of  Satellite Imaging Corporation)

satellite-image-antarctica

QuickBird (0.6m) Satellite Image  – Giza Pyramids, Egypt

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(Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of  Satellite Imaging Corporation)

quickbird-pyramids-egypt

Satellite Images of the Largest Deserts in the World

GeoEye-1 (0.5M) Satellite Image of Sahara Desert – 9,100,000+ KM

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Image credit: DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.

satellite photo sahara desert

ASTER (15M)  Satellite Image of the Arabian Desert – 2,330,000 KM

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Image credit: NASA/USGS/Japanese Space Team

IKONOS (1M) Satellite Image of the Gobi Desert, China (White Lines) - 1,300,000 KM

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Image credit: DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.

"GeoEye"

Landsat 7 (15M) Satellite Image of the Kalahari Desert, Africa – 900,000 KM

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Image Credit: NASA/USGS

satellite image kalahari desert

 

IKONOS (1M) Satellite Image of Great Victoria Desert, Australia (Ayers Rock) – 647,000 KM

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Image credit: DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.

satellite image ayers_rock_australia uluru

Landsat 7 (15M) Satellite Image of Syrian Desert – 492,000 KM

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Image credit: NASA/USGS

For more information on the Largest Deserts in the World visit here.

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Satellite Image of Goughan’s Corn Maze Liberty Bell

satellite image corn-mazeGeoEye-1 Satellite Image Goughan’s Corn Maze of Liberty Bell in Caribou, Maine

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(Copyright © DigitalGlobe and Courtesy of Satellite Imaging Corporation. All rights reserved.)

Goughan’s Annual Corn Maze, Caribou, Maine, USA I GeoEye-1 .50-meter I Collected September 11, 2012. This year’s patriotic theme at Goughan’s Berry Farm’s annual corn maze is captured from space in this GeoEye-1 image. For the last eight years, Mark Goughan has a new theme for the annual corn maze with this year’s depicting the Liberty Bell and a Freedom Eagle on top in honor of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The public is invited to navigate the maze in the fall for two months. The corn is planted in the spring and the design is cut into the field when the corn is about 2 feet high.

Satellite Image of Wadi As-Sirhan Saudi Arabia Crop Circles

satellite image saudi arabiaLandsat (15m) Satellite Image of Wadi As-Sirhan, Saudi Arabia Crop Circles in the Desert

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Image credit: NASA/USGS

Saudi Arabia has been steadily developing agricultural fields using center pivot irrigation. A remarkable example is in the Wadi As-Sirhan Basin in northwest Saudi Arabia.

The thirsty plants that rise out of the Arabian desert are quenched by water that dates back to the last Ice Age. In a more temperate past about 20,000 years ago, this “fossil” water filled aquifers that are now buried deep under the sand seas and limestone formations.

Saudi Arabians have reached this underground water source by drilling wells through sedimentary rock, as much as a kilometer beneath the desert sands. Although no one knows how much water lies beneath the desert—estimates range from 252 to 870 cubic kilometers—hydrologists believe it will only be economical to pump it for about 50 years.

Rainfall averages just 100 to 200 millimeters per year and usually does not recharge the underground aquifers, making the groundwater a non-renewable source. As of 2006, the country had 2.4 cubic kilometers of renewable fresh water resources at the surface, according to the Food and Agricultural Organization; consumption for human, industrial, and farming uses was 23.7 cubic kilometers per year. The volume of water used for desert agriculture tripled from about 6.8 cubic kilometers in 1980 to about 21 cubic kilometers in 2006.